M is a very small (12th percentile) little person. We have been encouraging her to eat more high protein and naturally high fat foods (read: we aren’t filling her with junk, but rather things like whole milk ricotta, avocados, cottage cheese and her favorite food- beans). She is actually a wonderful eater, her list of accepted foods is much larger than any toddler I have known. I attribute this to two things, a. the true lack of junk food in the house (minus dad’s cereal cabinet and mom’s persistant cravings for pizza and ice cream drumsticks) and b. that she was offered a large selection of organic homemade baby foods. I cooked (and mashed and mixed and strained) all M’s first foods myself (yes, we had jars for quick and hurried meals) and her current diet has maintained all the quality of those early meals. Teaching M to eat means much more to me than spoons and forks; good eating manners, knowledge of where food comes from, how to prepare it and how to make healthy decisions about the content of her meals is paramount.

M is a very small (12th percentile) little person. We have been encouraging her to eat more high protein and naturally high fat foods (read: we aren’t filling her with junk, but rather things like whole milk ricotta, avocados, cottage cheese and her favorite food- beans). She is actually a wonderful eater, her list of accepted foods is much larger than any toddler I have known. I attribute this to two things, a. the true lack of junk food in the house (minus dad’s cereal cabinet and mom’s persistant cravings for pizza and ice cream drumsticks) and b. that she was offered a large selection of organic homemade baby foods. I cooked (and mashed and mixed and strained) all M’s first foods myself (yes, we had jars for quick and hurried meals) and her current diet has maintained all the quality of those early meals. Teaching M to eat means much more to me than spoons and forks; good eating manners, knowledge of where food comes from, how to prepare it and how to make healthy decisions about the content of her meals is paramount.


If a child is to keep his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, excitement and mystery of the world we live in.
Rachel Carson


M has been asking to go back to the conservatory to see the fish since our visit on Wednesday. Maybe next week should be fish week!

M has been asking to go back to the conservatory to see the fish since our visit on Wednesday. Maybe next week should be fish week!


It is butterfly week at our house!

It is butterfly week at our house!


Stacking blocks are such a simple, yet useful toy. List of things we have used ours for:
Stacking (obviously! M is up to towers of 3, but prefers pyramid style…).
Sorting by color.
Letter identification.
Number identification.
Making trains.
Counting. 
Hide and seek.
Spelling.

love them.

Stacking blocks are such a simple, yet useful toy. List of things we have used ours for: Stacking (obviously! M is up to towers of 3, but prefers pyramid style…). Sorting by color. Letter identification. Number identification. Making trains. Counting. Hide and seek. Spelling.

love them.



Working on self feeding. Not quite there yet.

Working on self feeding. Not quite there yet.


lunch with M. black beans, wheat germ breaded chicken nuggets, cheese and milk. all organic, of course.

lunch with M. black beans, wheat germ breaded chicken nuggets, cheese and milk. all organic, of course.


Remember, you are not managing an inconvenience; you are raising a human being. (Kittie Franz)